April 18, 2024
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The Marvels of Omega-3 Fatty Acids
Navigating the Landscape of Women’s Health
Harnessing the Benefits of Vegetable Juices for Health
A Deep Dive into Nutritional Vitamins and Minerals
Navigating the Landscape of Health Policy and Management
Exploring the World of Health Food
Nourishing Your Body: Unique Ideas for Health Food
Secrets to a Healthier: Beyond Good, Towards Optimal Well-Being
Crafting Your Path to Wellness: Innovative Ideas for a Healthy Life
Embark on a Journey Towards Excellent Skin Health
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The Marvels of Omega-3 Fatty Acids Navigating the Landscape of Women’s Health Harnessing the Benefits of Vegetable Juices for Health A Deep Dive into Nutritional Vitamins and Minerals Navigating the Landscape of Health Policy and Management Exploring the World of Health Food Nourishing Your Body: Unique Ideas for Health Food Secrets to a Healthier: Beyond Good, Towards Optimal Well-Being Crafting Your Path to Wellness: Innovative Ideas for a Healthy Life Embark on a Journey Towards Excellent Skin Health
Sep
2023
22

Cosmetic treatments for smoother skin

Everyone wants smooth skin and a radiant complexion, so cosmetic treatments like creams and lotions are very popular nowadays. Post Topics: The importance of using the right moisturizer in your skincare routine, How to properly use the moisturizer, The effect of certain moisturizer ingredients on the skin, and The importance of choosing the right kind of moisturizer for your skin. The post topic is a good way to reach out to a specific group, in this case, people who want better-looking skin.

 

 

Skin treatment with collagen

 

Collagen injections are the most popular cosmetic treatment, but it is also one of the most important components of the skin. The body naturally produces collagen, but as we age, the body’s natural production of collagen slows down. This is a normal process, but it makes the skin less plump, soft, and firm. A collagen injection can revive the skin and

Jan
2023
8

More Orthopedic Physicians Sell Out to Private Equity Firms, Raising Alarms About Costs and Quality

Dr. Paul Jeffords and his colleagues at Atlanta-based Resurgens Orthopaedics were worried about their ability to survive financially, even though their independent orthopedic practice was the largest in Georgia, with nearly 100 physicians.

They nervously watched other physician practices sell out entirely to large hospital systems and health insurers. They refused to consider doing that. “It was an arms race,” Jeffords said, “and we knew we had to do something different if we wanted to remain independent and strong and offer good quality of care.”

So, in December 2021, Resurgens sold a 60% share in United Musculoskeletal Partners, their own management company, to Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe, a large New York-based private equity firm known as Welsh Carson. Although details of the sale were not disclosed, physician-shareholders in deals like this typically each receive a multimillion-dollar cash payout, plus the potential for subsequent big payouts each time the practice

Jan
2023
7

During In-Flight Emergencies, Sometimes Airlines’ Medical Kits Fall Short

In March, a Frontier Airlines flight was headed from Phoenix to Las Vegas when a female passenger stopped breathing. The flight attendant yelled in the cabin for help.

A passenger who was trained as a wilderness first responder, Seth Coley, jumped into action and found the woman was unresponsive and had a weak pulse. Coley dug through the plane’s medical kit but couldn’t find an oropharyngeal airway, a tool that was supposed to be there and that he needed to help the woman breathe. Instead, he cleared the airway by manipulating her neck.

Afterward, Coley sent a message to Denver-based Frontier Airlines via an online customer service form: “I saved somebody’s life on one of your flights,” he wrote. “I would like to speak about the medical kit you guys have on your flights. You are missing some very valuable and simple things. She almost died.”

Americans are flying at

Jan
2023
5

Public Health Agencies Try to Restore Trust as They Fight Misinformation

OKLAHOMA CITY — By the summer of 2021, Phil Maytubby, deputy CEO of the health department here, was concerned to see the numbers of people getting vaccinated against covid-19 slipping after an initially robust response. With doubt, fear, and misinformation running rampant nationwide — both online and offline — he knew the agency needed to rethink its messaging strategy.

So, the health department conducted something called an online “sentiment search,” which gauges how certain words are perceived on social media. The tool found that many people in Oklahoma City didn’t like the word “vaccinate” — a term featured prominently in the health department’s marketing campaign.

“If you don’t know how your message is resonating with the public,” Maytubby said, “you’re shooting in the dark.”

Across the country, health officials have been trying to combat misinformation and restore trust within their communities these past few years, a period when

Jan
2023
2

ER Doctors Call Private Equity Staffing Practices Illegal and Seek to Ban Them

A group of emergency physicians and consumer advocates in multiple states are pushing for stiffer enforcement of decades-old statutes that prohibit the ownership of medical practices by corporations not owned by licensed doctors.

Thirty-three states plus the District of Columbia have rules on their books against the so-called corporate practice of medicine. But over the years, critics say, companies have successfully sidestepped bans on owning medical practices by buying or establishing local staffing groups that are nominally owned by doctors and restricting the physicians’ authority so they have no direct control.

These laws and regulations, which started appearing nearly a century ago, were meant to fight the commercialization of medicine, maintain the independence and authority of physicians, and prioritize the doctor-patient relationship over the interests of investors and shareholders.

Those campaigning for stiffer enforcement of the laws say that physician-staffing firms owned by private equity investors are

Jan
2023
1

‘An Arm and a Leg’: Getting Insurance to Pay for Oral Surgery Is Like Pulling Teeth

Can’t see the audio player? Click here to listen.

Click here for a transcript of the episode.

Health coverage generally does not cover dental work. But Susan Rice of Atlanta should have been the exception: She was hit by a speeding car, causing extensive damage to her own “grill.” She’s been fighting to get her oral surgery covered for 18 months and counting.

The “An Arm and a Leg” podcast connected Rice with University of South Carolina law professor Jacqueline Fox, who, when she was practicing law, fought insurers on behalf of patients. Fox said Rice has “done everything right.” Her insurer’s refusal to pay may be tied to a bigger problem in the Affordable Care Act marketplace … one that’s led to a class-action lawsuit. 

Here’s a transcript of this episode.

“An Arm and a Leg” is a co-production of KHN and Public Road Productions.

To keep

Dec
2022
31

‘An Arm and a Leg’: The Year in Review, From Prenatal Testing to Insulin Pricing

Can’t see the audio player? Click here to listen.

In this year’s final episode, the editorial team behind the “An Arm and a Leg” podcast looks back on the stories from 2022 that hit close to home, including insulin pricing, surprise billing, and prenatal testing. Then, host Dan Weissmann shares updates on two court cases.

“An Arm and a Leg” is a co-production of KHN and Public Road Productions.

To keep in touch with “An Arm and a Leg,” subscribe to the newsletter. You can also follow the show on Facebook and Twitter. And if you’ve got stories to tell about the health care system, the producers would love to hear from you.

To hear all KHN podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to “An Arm and a Leg” on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, StitcherPocket Casts, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Dec
2022
29

Inmigrantes detenidos en centros enfrentan riesgo de covid como al inicio de la pandemia

LUMPKIN, Ga. — En octubre, Yibran Ramirez-Cecena no le dijo al personal del Centro de Detención de Stewart que tenía tos y secreción nasal. Está detenido en la instalación del suroeste de Georgia desde mayo, y ocultó sus síntomas por temor a que lo pusieran en confinamiento solitario si daba positivo para covid-19.

“Honestamente, no quería pasar 10 días solo en una habitación, lo llaman el agujero”, dijo Ramírez-Cecena, quien espera que decidan si es deportado a México o puede permanecer en los Estados Unidos, en donde ha vivido por más de dos décadas.

Poco antes de que Ramírez-Cecena se enfermara, los funcionarios del Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE) de la instalación le negaron su solicitud de alta médica. Es VIH positivo, que según la lista de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades es una afección que puede aumentar el riesgo de enfermar

Dec
2022
28

KHN’s ‘What the Health?’: The Covid Response Coordinator Speaks

Can’t see the audio player? Click here to listen on Acast. You can also listen on Spotify, Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Pocket Casts, or wherever you listen to podcasts.

Click here for a transcript of the episode.

Dr. Ashish Jha, the White House covid-19 response coordinator, is the guest for a wide-ranging interview on this week’s “What the Health?” podcast.

Jha, who is on leave from his “day job” as dean of the Brown University School of Public Health, said he’s particularly worried about the nation making the transition from public health emergency status back to a more normal footing and routine — particularly for low-income and uninsured people who may not be able to get the kind of covid tests, treatments, and vaccines that have so far been free through federal subsidies.

Jha said the Biden administration is doing more than the public realizes to study

Dec
2022
27

KHN-NPR’s ‘Bill of the Month’ at 5: A Treasury of Solutions for Confounding Medical Bills

In 2022, readers shared more than 1,000 personal stories of medical billing problems, contributing one patient at a time to an ongoing portrait of the rippling financial consequences of becoming sick or injured in the United States.

Many of the submissions received during the fifth year of KHN-NPR’s “Bill of the Month” investigative series conveyed the same message: I want to tell my story so what happened to me won’t happen to anyone else.

The stories told this year illuminated some of the major financial decisions American patients are pressed to make in their most vulnerable moments. We met Peggy Dula of Illinois, whose experience illustrated the financial risk patients accept when they get into an ambulance, even one from a local fire department. Sean Deines of North Carolina, who received a $489,000 air ambulance bill, offered a case from before the new federal law took effect last January banning